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“The Battle of Honey Springs” film to premiere in Checotah


By Darla Shelden, City Sentinel Reporter

OKLAHOMA CITY — The Oklahoma Historical Society (OHS) and the Friends of Honey Springs Battlefield have announced the premiere of a new film documenting the Battle of Honey Springs. The first showings of “The Battle of Honey Springs,” a Pantheon Digital Production, will take place on Saturday, August 28, at 5 p.m., 5:30 p.m., 6 p.m., 6:30 p.m., and 7 p.m. at the Honey Springs Battlefield Visitor Center, 423159 E 1030 Road, in Checotah.

The visitor center is located on a hill within close proximity to the Oklahoma Blues Hall of Fame in Rentiesville. Take the second left after reaching the Oklahoma Blues Hall of Fame Museum (driving from the west). 

A program with the director, producers, actors and historians will take place after the last showing, with a reception to follow.

“We are very excited to premiere ‘The Battle of Honey Springs,’” said OHS Executive Director Trait Thompson. “This new film is a first-class production that will allow us to tell the story of the battle in an engaging way for years to come.”

July 17, 1863, marked the largest Civil War battle to take place in present-day Oklahoma, then Indian Territory.

Near the community of Honey Springs, in the Muscogee Nation, Union and Confederate forces battled for control of Indian Territory.  Honey Springs Battlefield is located east of U.S. Highway 69 between Oktaha and Rentiesville.

Brother fought against brother as members of the Muscogee and Cherokee Nations fought on both sides, stated the press release. Previously enslaved members of the First Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment fought against their former enslavers and proved themselves to their commanders as they held the center of line, the release continued.

Ten American Indian tribes fought in the battle, including members of the Muscogee, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Seminole, Delaware, Kickapoo, Osage, Quapaw and Seneca tribes. 

The film documents this event, bringing the past to life to preserve the story for future generations, according to Adam Lynn, director of Honey Springs Battlefield.

“We are thankful to the Inasmuch Foundation for making this production possible through a grant to the Friends of Honey Springs Battlefield,” Lynn said.

“The Battle of Honey Springs” is a Pantheon Digital Production written and directed by Bryan Beasley and produced by Jaime Roman and Jon Roman,” he added. “The film stars Sidney Flack, Aaron Martin, David Burkhart, TS Akers, Roderick Berko, Tyler Huffman, Warren Gavitt, Jeremy Guana and Elisha Pratt.

“In addition to the actors, we have many individuals from the reenactment community to thank for their help with this production,” said Lynn. “We encourage visitors to come for the film and walk the battlefield interpretive trails.

“The trails will remain open until 7 p.m. on August 28 so you can enjoy one of the early showtimes, walk the trails, and return to the visitor center for the program and reception following the last show,” Lynn said. 

Honey Springs Battlefield is a division of the Oklahoma Historical Society. The mission of the Oklahoma Historical Society is to collect, preserve and share the history and culture of the state of Oklahoma and its people.

Admission is free, but reservations are required due to limited space. For reservations call 918-473-5572 or email [email protected].

The Oklahoma Historical Society recommends that visitors who have not been fully vaccinated wear masks.

Founded in 1893 by members of the Territorial Press Association, the OHS maintains museums, historic sites and affiliates across the state. Through its research archives, exhibits, educational programs and publications the OHS chronicles the rich history of Oklahoma.

For more information about the Oklahoma Historical Society, visit okhistory.org.  

July 17, 1863, marked the largest Civil War battle to take place in present-day Oklahoma, then Indian Territory. Oklahoma Historical Society website photo
Ten different American Indian tribes fought in the 1863 Battle of Honey Springs including members of the Muscogee, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Seminole, Delaware, Kickapoo, Osage, Quapaw and Seneca tribes. Facebook photo